Monday, 7 February 2011

Why is Alices 1st preference worth the same as Bobs 2nd? #Yes2AV vs #No2AV

We have Alice and Bob who want ice cream and Charlie is the ice-cream man.

Situation 1

1) Alice asks Charlie for a particular flavour of ice cream, Charlie gives her the flavour she asked for.(1st choice)
2) Bob asks Charlie for a particular flavour of ice cream, Charlie gives him the flavour he asked for. (1st choice)

Question: Does Bob like is ice cream more than Alice likes hers, the same or less?

Situation 2

1) Alice ask Charlie for a particular flavour of ice cream, Charlie gives her the flavour she asked for. (1st choice)
2) Bob ask Charlie for a particular flavour of ice cream, Charlie says he has none, so Bob asks for a different flavour and Charlie give him that flavour of ice cream. (2nd choice)

Question 1: Would Bob have liked his first choice of ice cream more than his second choice, the same or less?
Question 2: Does Bob like his ice cream more than Alice likes hers, the same or less?


Its seems pretty obvious to me that there is not enough information in either situation to say whether Bob or Alice like their ice cream most or not. With no way of measuring the value of the preference of Alice against the value of the preference of Bob, weighting is impossible (regardless of whether it is desirable or not!).

If someone can't understand this simple example of logical deduction, I really don't think they are qualified to discuss electoral systems...

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