Saturday, 4 April 2009

Who doesn't want their hand in our wallets?

It seems that some charities have been poorly run. They put money in financially insecure institutions, and when those institutions failed, they lost the money.

What is the response of these organisations? Is it to continue with their fundraising with new zeal - making special appeals directly to the public to bail them out of the mess they have created for themselves?

No, of course it isn't. Their response is to join the growing queue of special interest groups that want a slice of tax payers money straight from the government.

The government are borrowing billions against our future earnings and those of our children - with such a huge pot of money at their disposal, it is burning a hole in the governments pocket, and the special interest groups are circling.

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/Business/Credit-Crunch-Charities-Hit-By-Iceland-Banking-Collapse-Should-Get-Bail_Out-Say-MPs/Article/200904115255520?f=rss

I don't like the new breed of 'super charity' that is not a charity at all, but a full blown business in all but name. But which gets special treatment, particularly regarding tax.

Charity is about choice - they should not get a penny of taxpayer money.

http://fakecharities.org/